Muslimah Athletes™

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We believe that modesty and fitness are not mutually exclusive. Our mission is to cultivate a generation of fit Muslim women that demolish that stereotype; not only can we take you down with intelligence and rhetoric, but we can also dominate in sports. Our bodies are just as strong as our minds. Take notice: we are our own role models, and confident ones at that. Who says Muslimahs can't be athletes?
Anonymous asked: hello! I really enjoy your tumblr a lot (especially as a muslimah) but I just want to say that maybe you could be a little conscious of those who have eating disorders. It's okay to "stop when you're tired" for example. Over all, you guys are spot on but every now and then I see things that are just a little bit "fitspo" and I don't want someone with a disease like an ED to be triggered. :)


Answer:

Assalamu Alaikum dear,

thanks for bringing that to our attention, consider it noted. ♥

Have a great day!

— 5 months ago with 3 notes
repentantedisenet asked: Salaam people Ive torn my meniscus had surgery to repair it and have been non weight bearing for 4 of a likely 8 weeks I feel like a slob! Help!


Answer:

Salam dear,

I know this isn’t what you want to hear, but use this time to work on your upper body. Do arm exercises, of which there are plenty. You can even work out your abs by tightening them for a minute rep while you sit. I wish I knew the extent of your injury but I don’t, so unfortunately I can’t give you any tips, but as it improves slowly work on stretching your legs. I hope this helps. If you have any more details and think we could give you a better answer, send another message our way. :)

- Muslimah Athletes 

— 7 months ago
If you struggle with motivation, work out with a friend! You’re more likely to keep to the schedule when you have a partner to keep you going!

If you struggle with motivation, work out with a friend! You’re more likely to keep to the schedule when you have a partner to keep you going!

— 8 months ago with 2 notes
#fit  #fitspo  #fitblr  #fittips  #dailyinspo  #health  #healthy  #run  #runblr  #fitspiration  #fitness  #running  #nike  #asics 
chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!
LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.
Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!
Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!
Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.
Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!
Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.
Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.
Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.
Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.
Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.
Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!

LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.

Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!

Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!

Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.

Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!

Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.

Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.

Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.

Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.

Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.

Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

(via tumblrgym)

— 8 months ago with 10776 notes
#fitspo  #fitblr  #fitness 
So… You Want to Compete?

You’re a couch potato.

You’ve been a couch potato all your life, but you’re ready to change that. So you look for motivation, and you decide that your best option is to sign up for a competition, a race, a game, mark it in fire engine red on your calendar, and get moving. 

Here’s your step by step guide.

1. Decide what you love. There are so many options out there. Want to go solo? Opt for track. Maybe you prefer training in a pair. Try tennis. Or you want to go in full force with a group of friends: form a basketball, volleyball, soccer (the list goes on…) team. It’s all about finding something that’ll make you want to train on a regular basis.

2. Get good. Look up tutorials on YouTube to practice good form. Go to the park and play against strangers - unexpected technique will test your skills. Practice. Practice. Practice. Rest. Practice some more. If you go to college, join a club corresponding to the sport you picked. If you’re a high schooler, sign up for that extracurricular. If you’re not in school, check for classes at your local gym.

3. Be conscious of your diet. What you eat will always affect your performance. Always.

4. Sign up. Google is your best friend. Search for local races or competitions. Try to register well in advance because fees tend to spike the closer you get to the date!

5. And if you place… Send us photos to put up, and Muslimah Athletes will send you a free t-shirt!

6. Do it all over again! You might’ve thought the motivation wears off. We’ll let you in on a secret: it doesn’t.

Remember: the trick is to get started.

— 8 months ago with 3 notes
#compete  #fit  #fitblr  #fitness  #fitspo  #health  #healthy eating  #nutrition  #exercise  #work out  #sports  #athletes  #athletic  #muslimah athletes  #doyouevenlift 
sarathespitfire:

One of the proudest moments of my life was running a half marathon this past May. My time wasn’t as good as hoped because I was running on a bad foot, but I’d like to think it was pretty good for someone who has never run any official races before :) I’m going to run it again in 2014, and I’m aiming to be a full half hour faster… your body is a miracle. Embrace it.

sarathespitfire:

One of the proudest moments of my life was running a half marathon this past May. My time wasn’t as good as hoped because I was running on a bad foot, but I’d like to think it was pretty good for someone who has never run any official races before :) I’m going to run it again in 2014, and I’m aiming to be a full half hour faster… your body is a miracle. Embrace it.

— 8 months ago with 12 notes
#fit  #fitblr  #fitness  #health  #healthblr  #run  #runblr  #exercise  #nutrition  #dailyinspo